Roasted Eggplant with Tahini Yogurt Sauce

It’s about this time of year when I start craving summer vegetables. As much as I love spring onions, baby lettuce and asparagus, I begin to develop a deep longing for the fruits of midsummer, namely summer squash, red pepper, heirloom tomatoes and eggplant. Truth be told, I’ve never had much luck with eggplants in my garden. Though I try almost every year, the little plant stalks either wither away in the first stages, or the fruit becomes dinner for insects far before harvest time. Needless to say, I purchased these eggplants at the grocery store. Though I remain hopeful for this year’s nightshade garden. Look for medium-sized fruits that feel firm and weighty. The...

White Chicken Chili

Summer is almost here! But with weeks of clouds and rain in Virginia, I’m still focused on warm, brothy foods. This soup is just that. A full, hearty, and deeply nourishing meal. The following is a minimalist version of white chicken chili. Many recipes you’ll find contain heavy cream and/or cheese. While I’ll agree that cream and cheese have their place in some soups, I’m of the opinion that chicken chili isn’t one. Besides the lower calorie count, their absence allow the flavors of the a good chicken broth, hatch chilis and hot chili powder to shine through. Broth-centric, vegetable filled, with a healthy kick of heat–this soup is also good to stave off any...

Blueberry Scones and a Vacation

We’ve been gone. For the last week and a half, we’ve been sipping tea (and Guiness), eating soda bread (and scones) in Ireland. Our first vacation in far too many years. After traipsing through a rainy Dublin for two days we headed west, to County Clare, where we stayed four days in a cottage on a hill. It was an incredible and cathartic nine days, a little respite from the grind of daily life here at home. Though, of course, we were also happy to return to normalcy in Virginia. But, as the dust settles on our luggage and passports–I can’t help but long for the green hills. Discovery: irish...

Chicken Bone Broth and a Reset

  Sometimes the day is too much. And something about the passing of a minute grates on your soul. You lay awake nights. Something, somehow, doesn’t quite align. Like the pieces of a puzzle that make up your life simply won’t fit together. And in each one of those days you feel not quite like yourself. But at that same time questioning more deeply what exactly that would mean. At these moments when you feel like an outsider, a tourist in your own life. It’s time for a reset. A realignment, a change of perspective. During these times I tend to shift inward. I move away from small talk and outings, loud noises and...

Basic Sourdough Bread

Here it is. The product of much study. Bread from the sourdough starter, with which, successful results took me a journey of much failure to produce. I can happily say that today I produce consistently good loaves with my sourdough starter and the method below, though it did take some trial and error. This recipe (and method) originates from Chad Robertson’s Tartine Bread book. The original recipe was printed in the New York Times, though, I’d say, as with any recipe, that the secrets lie between the recipe lines. This is my take, commentary, and experience on the country loaf: I will say, that for any serious baker, a scale...

Sourdough Starter: A Memoir

It goes by many names: starter, levain, traditional sourdough. Whatever you call it, it’s having a moment. A major MAJOR moment. It’s all too familiar, the conversation with the cashier at the bakery, the attendant at the grocery store. I ask “Do you have real sourdough?” “Of course we do!” “OK, great. Does it have actual levain or sourdough starter in it?” Blank stare. Increasingly though, I’m starting to feel a little less insane. There are now two bakeries in my hometown that specialize in natural levain and traditional sourdough baking. For me, however, sourdough baking represents a multi-year effort. Fermentation holds a special fascination for me. What is a sourdough...

Homemade Sauerkraut

Traditional sauerkraut is less of a recipe, and more of a history lesson and a process. The ingredients are sparse: cabbage, salt, time. The entire process from cabbage to jar will take you under an hour (depending on volume, of course). What is traditional sauerkraut? Fermentation is an ancient food preservation technique. The process utilizes bacteria found in the environment to create a product that is shelf stable without refrigeration, freezing, or pressure canning. Sauerkraut is preserved through lactic acid fermentation–meaning that the naturally occurring bacteria lactobacilli is responsible for the culture and also for that characteristic sour flavor. Sauerkraut was the first fermentation recipe I ever tried. And honestly–I...

Sunday Almond Milk and the Beginning of a Blog

Hello Internet. I’m Kaitlin. I’m a food lover, health researcher, amateur cook, recovering journalist, nutrition student and avid kitchen experimenter. I live in the woods with a boyfriend and a dog. These are my stories, recipes, experiments and mishaps. I have had the idea in my mind to start a recipe blog for over six years. The idea has morphed, broken apart and came back together again —just about as many times as I have throughout the whole of my twenties. I’m the type of person who doesn’t like to share anything until it’s perfect. My comfort is in hours spent tweaking and re-aligning and preparing that not-quite-ready-for-outside-eyes thing so that...